Physical Education and Athletics

The physical education program supports students as they grow from the basics of games and sportsmanship in kindergarten to competing in interscholastic athletics in seventh and eighth grades. Along that developmental path, students develop as well-rounded athletes, learning to compete individually as a team, to understand how to live a healthy physical lifestyle, and to grow from their experiences. A key piece of the curriculum is teaching the value of a self-win. Regardless of the final score, students are challenged to see each experience as a win because it is an opportunity to grow and learn. Through the skill-building games of Lower School to the interscholastic competition in middle school, teachers and coaches work with students to improve with each practice and game. 

List of 8 items.

  • Pre-kindergarten

    Under construction.

    In the Lower School, students are introduced to basic loco-motor skills and activities that develop hand-eye and hand-foot coordination, spatial awareness, teamwork, and sportsmanship. In addition, teachers process these experiences with students individually and in groups, asking questions like, “Can a self-win also be a team win?” and “What does it mean to be a good sport?” Lower school students learn the mental and physical foundations that will help them succeed throughout their time at Norwood School and beyond.
  • Kindergarten

    Under construction.

    In the Lower School, students are introduced to basic loco-motor skills and activities that develop hand-eye and hand-foot coordination, spatial awareness, teamwork, and sportsmanship. Each year builds on the skills, games, and experiences from the previous year. Going beyond the games and activities, teachers process the experiences with students individually and in groups, asking questions like, “Can a self-win also be a team win?” and “What does it mean to be a good sport?” In the lower grades, students learn the mental and physical foundations that will help them succeed in later experiences on and off the field of play. 
  • First Grade

    Under construction.

    In the Lower School, students are introduced to basic loco-motor skills and activities that develop hand-eye and hand-foot coordination, spatial awareness, teamwork, and sportsmanship. Each year builds on the skills, games, and experiences from the previous year. Going beyond the games and activities, teachers process the experiences with students individually and in groups, asking questions like, “Can a self-win also be a team win?” and “What does it mean to be a good sport?” In the lower grades, students learn the mental and physical foundations that will help them succeed in later experiences on and off the field of play. 
  • Second Grade

    Under construction.

    In the Lower School, students are introduced to basic loco-motor skills and activities that develop hand-eye and hand-foot coordination, spatial awareness, teamwork, and sportsmanship. Each year builds on the skills, games, and experiences from the previous year. Going beyond the games and activities, teachers process the experiences with students individually and in groups, asking questions like, “Can a self-win also be a team win?” and “What does it mean to be a good sport?” In the lower grades, students learn the mental and physical foundations that will help them succeed in later experiences on and off the field of play. 
  • Third Grade

    Under construction.

    In the Lower School, students are introduced to basic loco-motor skills and activities that develop hand-eye and hand-foot coordination, spatial awareness, teamwork, and sportsmanship. Each year builds on the skills, games, and experiences from the previous year. Going beyond the games and activities, teachers process the experiences with students individually and in groups, asking questions like, “Can a self-win also be a team win?” and “What does it mean to be a good sport?” In the lower grades, students learn the mental and physical foundations that will help them succeed in later experiences on and off the field of play. 
  • Fourth Grade

    Under construction.

    In the Lower School, students are introduced to basic loco-motor skills and activities that develop hand-eye and hand-foot coordination, spatial awareness, teamwork, and sportsmanship. Each year builds on the skills, games, and experiences from the previous year. Going beyond the games and activities, teachers process the experiences with students individually and in groups, asking questions like, “Can a self-win also be a team win?” and “What does it mean to be a good sport?” In the lower grades, students learn the mental and physical foundations that will help them succeed in later experiences on and off the field of play. 
  • Grades 5 & 6

    The P.E. curriculum in fifth and sixth grades includes using increasingly complex motor skills with an emphasis on the core sports, physical fitness, teamwork, and team challenges. Students continue to broaden their understanding of the value of sportsmanship, teamwork, and respect for others. Importantly, lessons are differentiated to allow students of different abilities to engage the activity at an appropriately challenging level. Additionally, a consistent emphasis is placed on healthy eating habits, daily exercise, and the importance of a balanced lifestyle. Fifth and sixth graders have the option to participate in after-school interscholastic athletics during the fall, winter, and spring sports seasons. For a complete list of sports, visit the Athletics  page.
  • Grades 7 & 8

    In seventh and eighth grades, students fulfill their P.E. requirement by participating on an athletics team or more exploratory choices such as strength and conditioning and Summit, our signature outdoor education program. All of these experiences provide students with leadership opportunities, personal goal-setting, and life-long fitness skills. Building on the lessons from the lower and middle school P.E. classes, each sport and/or team focuses on sport-specific skillsets along with social development, personal improvement, teamwork, and sportsmanship. The program includes approximately 25 teams throughout three seasons. Each team practices four days a week for roughly one hour per day not counting games, field trips, special contests, and tournaments. For a complete list of sports, visit the Athletics page.

Faculty

List of 5 members.

  • Gerry Barrs 

    Summit Program Director
    California State University
  • Laini Bettencourt  

    Physical Education Teacher
    Southern New Hampshire University - B.S.
  • Chris Giles 

    Physical Education Teacher
    Guilford College - B.S.
    Fitchburg State College - M.Ed.
  • Jane Martens 

    Physical Education Coordinator
    University of Maryland - B.S.
  • Mitch Weisbrot 

    Athletic Director/Assistant Director of Auxiliary Programs
    University of Tampa - B.S.
    Goucher College - M.Ed.
Located in Bethesda, MD, Norwood School develops students in grades PK-8 into confident lifelong learners who have the academic, character, and leadership skills to succeed in high school and beyond. Recognizing that children are multi-faceted, Norwood provides many opportunities for safe risk-taking, exploration, discovery, and growth in a nurturing, supportive, and inclusive school community.